5. Hotel A

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Hotels intersperse the East and West Ranges. These buildings were rented to Hotelkeepers, each of whom owned many people who were expected to prepare meals and provide cleaning for the students. On a daily basis, the enslaved would bring fresh water to the students and tend their fires. They regularly cleaned the rooms and public spaces of the Academical Village. In addition, in the basements and gardens, they prepared the meals that were served to students in the Hotels. This work required an extensive labor force. In 1830, the Conways who operated Hotel A owned twelve people who may have lived in the basement and in outbuildings in the gardens. At any time, the population of enslaved people living and working in the Academical Village was between 90 to 150 in the decades before emancipation. In the course of carrying out their responsibilities, free and enslaved African Americans interacted with white students in the hotel dining halls, student dormitory rooms, and throughout the Academical Village on a regular basis. On occasion, these daily interactions could and did turn violent. Faculty records document that students resulted to physical violence upon the bodies of free and enslaved laborers for a variety of "offences," including insolence, impertinent language, or a perceived lack of attention to duties. For example, Mr. Rose complained to the faculty when a student kicked one of his enslaved workers and Col. Moon objected when a student threw a knife. Even when students were judged by faculty to be at fault, their actions very rarely led to suspension.

Exterior viewing only, building not open to the public

Exterior viewing only, building not open to the public